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Akin Reviews

Akin by Emma Donoghue

Akin

Emma Donoghue

3.59 out of 5

9 reviews

Imprint: Picador
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
Publication date: 3 Oct 2019
ISBN: 9781529019964

A retired professor's life is thrown into chaos when he takes his adolescent great-nephew to the French Riviera in hopes of uncovering long-buried family secrets, in this stunning masterpiece from bestselling author Emma Donoghue.

3 stars out of 5
Phil Baker
13 Oct 2019

"Donoghue contrives a neat comedy of errors as Noah tries to make sense of Michael’s world."

Donoghue contrives a neat comedy of errors as Noah tries to make sense of Michael’s world. “Time of the month” isn’t about periods but the welfare cheque, and Michael’s tattoo “FOE” doesn’t mean, as Noah fears, that he’s an enemy of society, but stands for “family over everything”. As Michael snaps selfies on his phone, he echoes the fictional French photographer Père Sonne, from whom they are both descended, and his inherited visual savvy helps Noah understand the old photographs, which indicated that his mother might have been a Nazi collaborator.

Reviews

5 stars out of 5
Sarah Crown
12 Oct 2019

"If Room forced home truths on us, about parenthood, responsibility and love, Akin deals with similar subject matter more subtly, but in the end just as compellingly"

Atmospherically, [Donoghue's] two novels could hardly be further apart: Room is lightless, squalid, oppressive; Akin is set for the most part amid the restaurants and promenades and bright, caressing sun of the French Riviera. But the more I turned the pages, the more evident the similarities became... Themes of imprisonment run through both novels, as do questions of what it means to be related. If this book demonstrates Donoghue’s range as an author – and it does, in spades – it also shows her circling back to a handful of key concerns. In Akin, she has found a way to consider the subjects of love, freedom and family from a freshly illuminating perspective... If Room forced home truths on us, about parenthood, responsibility and love, Akin deals with similar subject matter more subtly, but in the end just as compellingly; like Noah and Michael, the books are superficially different, but fundamentally connected. This is a quietly moving novel that shows us how little we know one another, but how little, perhaps, we need to know in order to care.

4 stars out of 5
Helena Mulkerns
11 Oct 2019

"Sparkles with Emma Donoghue’s clear, often witty style"

Akin sparkles with Donoghue’s clear, often witty style. We recognise familiar themes and are introduced to new ones such as the challenges of an aging society, climate change and the destabilising effects of new wars in a digital age. As always, the work is partially based on fact; the Marcel Network was a real group of people who saved 527 children from Nazi death camps. Donoghue’s crafted combination of historical context and current social issues make her book compelling and important, as well as delivering a well-paced and intelligent read. Akin is all about connections, and at the root of the book, we can identify an exploration of the essential ties that bind humans into the phenomenon known as family.

4 stars out of 5
10 Oct 2019

"For fans of the bleak intensity of Room, this may feel like a bit of light-hearted escapism, but scratch the surface and you will quickly discover it is just as keenly observed as its predecessor."

There are times when the aspects of Michael’s life which Noah finds astonishing – such as Snapchat (“Was that slang for gossip?”) – are bordering on the predictable, but then we remember that an 80-year-old academic may well not be familiar with social media. Similarly, Michael is often shocked by Noah’s irreverence. The pace is gentle, yet the vividly drawn characters of Michael and Noah bring the book to life. For fans of the bleak intensity of Room, this may feel like a bit of light-hearted escapism, but scratch the surface and you will quickly discover it is just as keenly observed as its predecessor.

2 stars out of 5
Melissa Katsoulis
4 Oct 2019

"There’s a constant feeling of waiting for something to happen, but it never does."

The writing is OK, the characters a little empty (you could never weep for either of them, which is odd, especially considering how much loss little Michael has experienced) and there’s no magic feeling of being swept up in a journey with real people in a real place. Instead, despite the strong opening, you are simply left wandering the streets of Nice feeling bored, frustrated and disenfranchised, not unlike Michael himself, the boy who could have made this book great.

3 stars out of 5
1 Oct 2019

"Donoghue is a lover of facts and objects, and it’s pleasant to spend time in her company. "

Donoghue is a lover of facts and objects, and it’s pleasant to spend time in her company. There is a plethora of interesting detail – about chemistry, history, photography and a great deal else – running throughout the book. Unfortunately, the subplot about Noah’s family history never quite bites, and despite its elegant treatment of theme the story struggles to get into gear. There’s no doubt that Akin is a nice book. But nice is just a place in France.

4 stars out of 5
29 Sep 2019

"Poignant and hopeful, the bestselling novelist of Room ​​​​​​​has delivered another exquisite portrayal of an adult and child making their way in the world"

Professor Noal Selvaggio is about to embark on a trip to Nice to uncover his mother's wartime secrets, when he receives a call from social services, asking him to look after his great-nephew, Micheal. In a mesmerising read, we follow this rather odd couple on a journey to solve a mystery. Poignant and hopeful, the bestselling novelist of Room has delivered another exquisite portrayal of an adult and child making their way in the world.

4 stars out of 5
Stephanie Cross
26 Sep 2019

"There’s some weighty stuff nimbly woven into this highly enjoyable novel... Yet it’s consistently sprightly. "

Emma Donoghue is a first-rate historical novelist, but she’s still best known for Room, her harrowing, heart-in-mouth, modern-day tale of an imprisoned mother and son. Family ties are her subject here too, but the bond is a more unusual one... There’s some weighty stuff nimbly woven into this highly enjoyable novel — the Holocaust; the blighting effects of poverty; American police corruption. Yet it’s consistently sprightly. The bickering and bantering of the sparring duo keeps things skipping along and Donoghue’s fondness for her odd couple radiates winningly off the page.

4 stars out of 5
Clémence Michallon
22 Sep 2019

"A keenly observed novel about family that is a complete departure from Room"

Through the mysteries of Michael and Noah’s respective upbringings (Noah wrestles with the possibility that his mother might have collaborated with the Nazis, while discovering that Victor and Amber’s plight might be more complex than expected), Donoghue delivers a profound reflection on family secrets and the way they shape our current identities. Her profoundly human portrayal of Michael elicits a crucial form of empathy for the lives disrupted by the opioid crisis and raises questions on its impact on generations to come. All this makes Akin an important, touching novel that stays with you long after you’re done reading it.