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City of Windows Reviews

City of Windows by Robert Pobi

City of Windows

Robert Pobi

3.43 out of 5

3 reviews

Imprint: Mulholland Books
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton
Publication date: 6 Aug 2019
ISBN: 9781529353112

The launch of a major new American thriller series with a standout hero: Lucas Page sees crime from a different angle, and only he can stop a series of impossible killings.

2 stars out of 5
Mark Sanderson
17 Aug 2019

"Page owes a lot to Jeffery Deaver’s quadriplegic Lincoln Rhyme and the TV drama Numb3rs. "

 Page owes a lot to Jeffery Deaver’s quadriplegic Lincoln Rhyme and the TV drama Numb3rs. He sees the world as “a matrix of interconnected digits” — which makes him tiresome company — unlike his African-American female sidekick and Dingo, his Australian lodger. And we never learn how he ended up half-man, half-machine. Do we care? Not really.

Reviews

4 stars out of 5
Geoffrey Wansell
15 Aug 2019

"Told at a ferocious pace in staccato prose, this thriller truly gets the blood racing"

The internationally bestselling Pobi has created a memorable new character in one-time child maths prodigy Dr Lucas Page, a retired FBI man who is now a physics professor. He lost a leg, an arm and an eye while working for the Bureau and had to leave. Now, ten years on, his former agency partner has been killed by a sniper in New York and Page’s colleagues want him to come back to help them catch him... It is the first of a series of shootings by the sniper, and Page, assisted by a female FBI agent, sets out to catch the killer, with echoes of Jeffery Deaver’s famous quadriplegic Lincoln Rhyme. Told at a ferocious pace in staccato prose, this thriller truly gets the blood racing. 

4 stars out of 5
11 Aug 2019

"Page is a canny reworking of earlier sleuths: a Sherlock Holmes who’s also a family man"

Page is a canny reworking of earlier sleuths: a Sherlock Holmes who’s also a family man, a Lincoln Rhyme whose disabilities don’t debar him from action scenes. And Pobi deftly pairs him with a black female agent with mind-reading skills, forming a double act with obvious film potential. All that mars their pulsating first outing is the official FBI theory of the killings they have to contend with: that a French terrorist was responsible is too dementedly far-fetched.