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Don't Look Back In Anger Reviews

Don't Look Back In Anger by Daniel Rachel

Don't Look Back In Anger

The rise and fall of Cool Britannia, told by those who were there

Daniel Rachel

3.57 out of 5

3 reviews

Imprint: Trapeze
Publisher: Orion Publishing Co
Publication date: 5 Sep 2019
ISBN: 9781409180715

Tony Blair, Noel Gallagher, Damon Albarn, Tracey Emin, Irvine Welsh and an abundance of other contributors unite in this ambitious oral narrative charting the epic highs and crashing lows of the UK's most creative and hedonistic period: the nineties.

  • The Sunday TimesMust Read
4 stars out of 5
Victoria Segal
25 Aug 2019

"Through this shifting, twisting narrative, Rachel creates a potent record of a time when things really did stand a chance of getting better, but somehow ended up significantly worse"

Daniel Rachel’s A-list, A-grade oral history of the Britpop 1990s, broadly outlined here as the years between the explosion of acid house and the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997, generates a more fluid portrayal than the headlines suggest, high-calibre interviewees from music, art, comedy and politics offering mercurial perspectives on a time that began with the promise of outlaw creativity, but as the winds changed quickly hardened into a coked-up grotesque...Through this shifting, twisting narrative, Rachel creates a potent record of a time when things really did stand a chance of getting better, but somehow ended up significantly worse.

Reviews

3 stars out of 5
4 Sep 2019

"How the Nineties dream turned sour"

The early part of the book succeeds in identifying the unlikely strands of indie rock, club culture, sport and fashion that will eventually knit together in the mid-Nineties. I remember when I felt all of this coalescing: watching Oasis walk on stage at Irvine, Beach Park in June 1995, kicking footballs into the crowd, many of the audience wearing football tops or Stone Island clothes, many of them pilled out of their minds, punching the air – in and on ecstasy – as the band went into “Acquiesce”.

3 stars out of 5
Kitty Empire
26 Aug 2019

"[an] entertaining oral history"

Even if you are familiar with, say, the Britpop saga, the machinations that produced the Young British Artists, the Turner prize and the Tate Modern are illuminating. If you’re in the habit of reading political memoirs, the extent to which Labour relied on Manchester United boss Alex Ferguson for advice might be revelatory... Oral histories are eminently readable, allowing for dissent and contrast. Rachel’s editorialising is confined to an explanatory introduction and his fairly blokeish agenda-setting... Perhaps the book’s greatest irritation is its repeated attempts to define Cool Britannia, which leaves everyone floundering or hand-wringing. There was a confluence and a cross-pollination of many creatives in a booming economy under a helpful government. This book is a timely reminder, though, of exactly how much messaging, perception and image counted – not so different from the Instagram era after all, perhaps.