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Down in the Valley Reviews

Down in the Valley by Laurie Lee

Down in the Valley

A Writer's Landscape

Laurie Lee

Score pending

2 reviews

Imprint: Penguin Classics
Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd
Publication date: 7 Nov 2019
ISBN: 9780241411674

A moving, never-before-published portrait of the landscape that shaped the life of Laurie Lee, the beloved author of Cider With Rosie.

2 stars out of 5
John Carey
10 Nov 2019

"reads like a sanitised version of Cider with Rosie"

The wild extravagances of phrasing that power every page of Cider with Rosie find no match here. Even when Lee is repeating an anecdote from the earlier book the language remains unremarkable. That should remind us that Cider with Rosie did not just flow from him like birdsong. Not published till 1959, it cost him years of toil to fashion it into something marvellous and to make it seem spontaneous. When he wrote verse rather than prose he did not bother to make it seem natural and spontaneous, which is one reason it was relatively unsuccessful. 

Reviews

3 stars out of 5
8 Nov 2019

"Age is taking Lee’s eyesight but polishing up the anecdotes and deepening his characteristic note of wistfulness for a lost age."

In fewer than 100 pages, this attractive but slight book treads some familiar territory, then – meaning territory familiar to readers of Cider with Rosie, or Lee’s later books and essays. Here is Miss Flynn, drowning in the village pond. Here is a little variation on the tale told in As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning about how Lee luckily received a replacement violin in Spain after his “imitation Stradivarius” was crushed by “a passing bull who had a very bad ear for music”. Poems are recited (“Each bird and stone, each roof and well, / feels the gold foot of autumn pass”) and the local, myth-rich maps lovingly spread out. Age is taking Lee’s eyesight but polishing up the anecdotes and deepening his characteristic note of wistfulness for a lost age. He was “seven-eighths fantasy”, as another interviewer had observed, and much of the reality of his life is omitted from Down in the Valley. It is, nonetheless, a fine thing to revisit this writer’s landscape and hear his amiable voice in it again.