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Factfulness Reviews

Factfulness by Hans Rosling, Ola Rosling, Anna Rosling Ronnlund

Factfulness

Ten Reasons We're Wrong About The World - And Why Things Are Better Than You Think

Hans Rosling, Ola Rosling, Anna Rosling Ronnlund

4.40 out of 5

3 reviews

Category: Non-fiction
Imprint: Sceptre
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton General Division
Publication date: 3 Apr 2018
ISBN: 9781473637467

'A hopeful book about the potential for human progress when we work off facts rather than our inherent biases.' BARACK OBAMA Timely, short and essential, FACTFULNESS reveals the power of facts in a post-truth world, by late international sensation Hans Rosling ('a true inspiration' - Bill Gates) and his long-term collaborators Ola and Anna.

1 Prize for Factfulness

Business Book of the Year

Reviews

4 stars out of 5
3 Jul 2019

"How a book offering a bright worldview became a surprise bestseller"

Rosling realised that we have what he called an “overdramatic” worldview, and that we intuitively refer to this when thinking, guessing or learning. Our tendency to misinterpret facts is instinctive — an evolutionary adaption to help us make quick decisions to avoid danger. While we still need these instincts, they can also trip us up.

4 stars out of 5
Robbie Millen
28 Apr 2018

"It is a blast of optimism against the monstrous regiment of doomsters."

Rosling, a doctor, professor of international health and data lover, spent his life, until he died last year, combating such ignorance by making us look at the statistics. If that sounds dry, his style is not. He was a showman, enlivening his talks about child mortality rates with demonstrations of sword swallowing (you can watch them on YouTube). His children Ola and Anna have finished this book, but the voice — folksy, humorous, amiable — is his. It is a blast of optimism against the monstrous regiment of doomsters.

5 stars out of 5
David Pilling
5 Apr 2018

"Rosling backs up his ideas with an extraordinary ability to bring data to life. "

Rosling backs up his ideas with an extraordinary ability to bring data to life. Progress in his native Sweden — which at the time of his birth in 1948 had the same levels of health and wealth as today’s Egypt — is illustrated by a story of his grandmother’s fascination with the washing machine. Having spent much of her life hand-washing clothes, she was so enthralled by the labour-saving device that when Rosling’s mother bought one, she would watch entire spin cycles as avidly as if she were enjoying television. That sort of transformative progress is happening all around the world today, says Rosling, including in south Asia and, increasingly, in urban Africa — a continent about which he is far more “possibilist” than most commentators.