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Machines Like Me Reviews

Machines Like Me by Ian McEwan

Machines Like Me

Ian McEwan

3.77 out of 5

15 reviews

Imprint: Jonathan Cape Ltd
Publisher: Vintage Publishing
Publication date: 18 Apr 2019
ISBN: 9781787331662

Britain has lost the Falklands war, Margaret Thatcher battles Tony Benn for power and Alan Turing achieves a breakthrough in artificial intelligence. This near-perfect human is beautiful, strong and clever - a love triangle soon forms.

  • The Sunday TimesMust Read
5 stars out of 5
Peter Kemp
14 Apr 2019

"In this bravura performance, literary flair and cerebral sizzle winningly combine"

Any risk of the novel hardening into the diagrammatic is dispelled by the warm alert humaneness with which McEwan conveys the child’s endangered plight. Molested youngsters provided gothic shocks in his callowly sensational early books. In The Child in Time, a pivotal work for him, his attention moved on to tampered-with childhoods and the way they can warp maturity. Since then, sensitivity to the vulnerability of the young has been a significant part of his wide-ranging repertoire as a writer.

Machines Like Me displays that repertoire in all its impressive richness. Excited by ideas and perceptive about emotions, encompassing cutting-edge science, philosophical speculation and lively social observation, it is funny, thought-provoking and politically acute (its divided nation obliquely mirrors Brexit-bisected Britain). In this bravura performance, literary flair and cerebral sizzle winningly combine.

Reviews

3 stars out of 5
12 Jun 2019

"a fictional mathematical discovery is placed in the past and its ripple effects are carried forward"

In his work, McEwan frequently invites us to accept intolerable characters by reminding us that we are all as disturbing as our narrator, we are all minimizing and washing out the other, to settle ourselves. We are all unevolved. Two of the Eves in Riyadh commit suicide, and Turing comments, “It might give the writers of the affect code some consolation to learn that they died in each other’s arms. I could tell you similar stories of machine sadness”. These sad machines, who could one day evolve beyond their pain, are stuck with the limitations of “human intelligence” – like children stuck in care, like the mis-sentenced criminal in prison, like all of us trapped in Charlie’s head.

3 stars out of 5
5 May 2019

"The book is full of free-floating fears"

This is a cautionary tale, and being based as it is on extensive research carries discursive weight, but like others of his recent novels, it remains divided, emotion and information unconnected, while off to one side a chorus underlines the moral issues, sets essay titles and suggests model answers, without ever questioning what human longings are all about.

2 stars out of 5
Laura Miller
29 Apr 2019

"The result works neither as a parable of free will and selfhood nor as an experiment in imagining the quandaries waiting in our future"

McEwan has often been celebrated for his interest in science, but the alternate history he has created for this fiction is even more rickety than Charlie’s car. Charlie’s world surpasses our own, posits McEwan, with such impressive advances as “brain-machine interfacing” and organic-seeming androids, because Alan Turing, instead of committing suicide at 41, has survived into old age. Brilliant as Turing was, this vein of Great Man sentimentalism is silly. For example, if McEwan thought about it a bit, he’d have realized that creating a product like Adam, Charlie’s robot, would require advances in many more fields than artificial intelligence... The result works neither as a parable of free will and selfhood nor as an experiment in imagining the quandaries waiting in our future. If only McEwan could strap on those antigravity boots and travel at 10 times the speed light back into the past. Then he could start this lazy, flimsy novel over, only this time with the humility to learn from those who have boldly gone before. 

5 stars out of 5
Alex Preston
22 Apr 2019

"A novel this smart oughtn’t to be such fun, but it is"

This is a novel that holds up the form as an example of the unreplicable subtlety of the human mind. While Adam composes haikus of stultifying banality to Miranda, he finds the novel’s obsession with misunderstandings and reversals obsolete in an age when technology has colonised the private life. Novels, McEwan is saying, do something that robots can’t: they are a heroic record of our imperfections, a celebration of the flaws that make us human... There’s not been a bad Ian McEwan novel since the Booker-winning Amsterdam, but this is right up there with his very best. Machines Like Me manages to combine the dark acidity of McEwan’s great early stories with the crowd-pleasing readability of his more recent work. A novel this smart oughtn’t to be such fun, but it is.

4 stars out of 5
Dwight Garner
22 Apr 2019

"a sharply intelligent novel of ideas"

“Machines Like Me” is a sharply intelligent novel of ideas. McEwan’s writing about the creation of a robot’s personality allows him to speculate on the nature of personality, and thus humanity, in general.

This book can remind one of certain of John Updike’s novels, such as “Roger’s Version” (1986), which was about God and computer science. These were primarily repositories for the author’s essayistic thinking. In those books, as in McEwan’s new one, proper narrative and believable characters seem to have been added almost as an afterthought... There are some pokey moments in this novel, some dead nodes. But McEwan has an interesting mind and he is nearly always good company on the page. In whichever direction he turns, he has worthwhile commentary to make.

4 stars out of 5
Alex Preston
22 Apr 2019

"Ian McEwan is on top form with this counterfactual tale of love between man, woman… and robot"

There’s not been a bad Ian McEwan novel since the Booker-winning Amsterdam, but this is right up there with his very best. Machines Like Memanages to combine the dark acidity of McEwan’s great early stories with the crowd-pleasing readability of his more recent work. A novel this smart oughtn’t to be such fun, but it is.

3 stars out of 5
13 Apr 2019

"The pages certainly keep turning, but it feels painfully like the sort of thing a sophisticated robot might have come up with if "

Machines Like Me has the usual virtues of McEwan’s prose. It feels much shorter than it is, and every other page has some felicitous sentence or amusing observation that makes one think (a little)... For all this, the novel feels thin... The pages certainly keep turning, but it feels painfully like the sort of thing a sophisticated robot might have come up with if fed a few thousand pages of McEwan’s early novels (trauma, check; stalker, check; sexual violence, check) and tasked with producing a pastiche... McEwan does well in raising the question, and the fruits of his doubtless copious research appear dutifully on the page. But he doesn’t go very far in helping us to understand it, still less to answer it.

2 stars out of 5
13 Apr 2019

"It’s a bland book offered as an inventive one."

McEwan’s style never lets the reader forget the novel’s topic. Some opening exposition is to be forgiven but it soon becomes McEwan’s modus operandi: baggy, generalised, journalistic sentences. When these sentences riff on the majesty of Adam’s creation – “Before us lay the ultimate plaything, the dream of ages, the triumph of humanism” – they’re rather irritating. When they’re describing scientific concepts, they read like Wikipedia... One gets the sense that McEwan is trying to write two novels at once, or that the novel he began writing – about artificial intelligence and robotics – became superseded along the way by another, more topical, novel: a Brexit novel. In the end, though, Machines Like Me isn’t really either. It’s a bland book offered as an inventive one.

  • The GuardianBook of the Week
4 stars out of 5
Marcel Theroux
11 Apr 2019

"morally complex and very disturbing, animated by a spirit of sinister and intelligent mischief that feels unique to its author"

Machines Like Me belongs to the genre of speculative fiction, but in its narrow focus on morally ambiguous characters in a bleak cityscape it also owes a debt to film noir, sharing noir’s conviction that nothing is more human than moral inconsistency... Machines Like Me is closer in character to the dark and subversive McEwan of his earlier books than to the stiff and self-conscious one of Saturday, who seemed burdened by the responsibility of finding himself head boy of English letters. The novel is morally complex and very disturbing, animated by a spirit of sinister and intelligent mischief that feels unique to its author.

3 stars out of 5
Lara Feigel
11 Apr 2019

"Machines Like Me reminds us that McEwan is a once-in-a-generation talent, offering readerly pleasure, cerebral incisiveness and an enticing imagination"

Machines Like Me is an enjoyable, even addictive, read but it’s ultimately disappointing in the way that all Ian McEwan’s novels have been since Atonement. AI matters, and does indeed provoke important ethical questions. The novel is an appropriately moral form in which to confront these and McEwan is in many ways the right person to do so. He’s intelligent enough to understand the science of AI and the philosophy of consciousness. He’s a brilliant novelist, who creates believable characters with ease. From the start, Charlie and Miranda’s relationship has an urgency that makes it easy to care what happens to them. But as with so many of McEwan’s books, it all feels too neat... Machines Like Me reminds us that McEwan is a once-in-a-generation talent, offering readerly pleasure, cerebral incisiveness and an enticing imagination. But we need him to leave his diagrammatic, even robotic comfort zone and trust in the messiness that characterises both human life and the novel at their richest.

3 stars out of 5
11 Apr 2019

"a clever, densely worked but sporadically irritating read"

...it’s also a “what if?” novel set in an alternative Eighties where the internet and self-driving cars already exist, Margaret Thatcher loses the Falklands War and the Beatles have “recently regrouped after 12 years apart”. To underline that this is also a thoughtful, moral tale, there are subplots involving the nature of violation and revenge, and what it means to be a parent. And a soupçon of juvenile gender-fluidity too. Even for someone of McEwan’s fluency, that’s a lot to pack in.... So, Machines Like Me is a clever, densely worked but sporadically irritating read, throughout which you hear McEwan whispering in your ear. All the various themes are duly brought together in a way that is perhaps too neat but which is also satisfying.  

4 stars out of 5
Johanna Thomas-Corr
10 Apr 2019

"I should stress that I found this mediocre McEwan more compulsive than many flawless novels"

However, having worked hard to configure his world, McEwan seems uninterested in playing with it. Why doesn’t Charlie take Adam to meet his friends? Or play squash? Given there are only 25 such machines in the world, surely the press would be swarming? Adam remains stubbornly stationary in Charlie’s kitchen, a mouthpiece for McEwan’s neat disquisitions on quantum mechanics, the case for war, the future of privacy... I should stress that I found this mediocre McEwan more compulsive than many flawless novels. There’s a lot to chew on here and, as ever, you feel in safe hands. Perhaps, though, that’s the problem. Machines Like Me never unsettles, which is odd given it’s a book about human redundancy, sexual assault, political turmoil and escalating war. The stakes are high, but the danger is remote. 

4 stars out of 5
4 Apr 2019

"you’ll also find it hard not to admire the sheer scale of McEwan’s ambition"

Ian McEwan has always been a generous writer to his readers, his novels bulging with big ideas and rich story-telling. Here, though, he almost seems to be channelling the spirit of Mrs Doyle, the persistent housekeeper from Father Ted — constantly offering us more and more to chew on...By the end of the book, you might feel — like one of Mrs Doyle’s guests — pretty stuffed. But you’ll also find it hard not to admire the sheer scale of McEwan’s ambition. Many literary novels claim to be exploring ‘what it is to be human’. Few carry out this exploration as thoroughly, or as literally, as this does. 

3 stars out of 5
Janan Ganesh
3 Apr 2019

"a technically masterful if occasionally bloodless novel"

When he won the Booker Prize in 1998, it was for Amsterdam, which has its say on modern mores but ultimately deals in the specificities of its individual characters. Machines Like Me does not. It leans on philosophic rumination. Which lives, for example, should an automated car prioritise? It is erudite, open-minded stuff, but it rather demotes the characters to vessels for ideas... McEwan’s willingness to stretch the reader with ideas is precious and unfashionable. When Charlie tracks down a still-living Alan Turing, the old man’s disquisition on how the artificial mind learns is a passage that probably not a single one of the novelist’s British contemporaries could have written. But it could be Miranda, or Adam, or a cipher, who is hearing it. Readers will care less than they might have done about Briony in Atonement or the stalked protagonist in Enduring Love. The character has become a conduit for grand thoughts.