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Meet Me at the Museum Reviews

Meet Me at the Museum by Anne Youngson

Meet Me at the Museum

Anne Youngson

Score pending

2 reviews

Imprint: Doubleday
Publisher: Transworld Publishers Ltd
Publication date: 17 May 2018
ISBN: 9780857525512

The Observer Promising first-time British novelists 2018: 'A novel about self-discovery and second chances''Insightful, emotionally acute and absorbing' Daily Express'Meet Me at the Museum starts so quiet and small like a bud tightly closed against the winter then it unfurls into something so alive and truly beautiful.

1 Prize for Meet Me at the Museum

Costa Book Awards
2018 Shortlist

Shortlisted: Debut Novel of the Year

The Costa Judges: ‘A warm and well-observed story of love in later life, unexpected friendship and the ties that bind.’

Reviews

4 stars out of 5
Fanny Blake
13 Dec 2018

"an intriguing and tender read about friendship and hope"

Recently shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award, 70-year-old Anne Youngson proves that it’s never too late to succeed at something new. Tina Hopgood, a grandmother and farmer’s wife living in Bury St Edmunds, writes to Professor Glob, at the Silkeborg Museum in Denmark, who once dedicated a book to her and her classmates. But the professor has died and so a reply comes from the new curator, Professor Anders Larsen. The two lonely people tentatively begin a correspondence that becomes a lifeline for them both. An intriguing and tender read about friendship and hope.

4 stars out of 5
Hannah Beckerman
27 May 2018

"a thoughtful and gentle meditation on buried passions, regrets, love, grief and loneliness"

Youngson’s epistolary novel follows the correspondence between Tina Hopgood – a farmer’s wife living in Bury St Edmunds – and professor Anders Larsen, a curator at a Danish museum. What begins as an inquiry about the Tollund Man, and Tina’s thwarted plans to visit the museum, soon develops into a much-valued friendship. As the two enter into detailed discussions about history and archaeology, as well as sharing intimate details about their family lives, the book becomes a thoughtful and gentle meditation on buried passions, regrets, love, grief and loneliness. But Youngson’s debut offers hope for change in its tender exploration of what it means to have experienced a life well-lived.