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Rise Reviews

Rise by Gina Miller

Rise: Life Lessons in Speaking Out, Standing Tall & Leading the Way

Gina Miller

3.14 out of 5

3 reviews

Imprint: Canongate Books Ltd
Publisher: Canongate Books Ltd
Publication date: 30 Aug 2018
ISBN: 9781786892904

An extraordinary account of what it means to stand up for justice, and for yourself, no matter the cost

4 stars out of 5
Eleanor Mills
2 Sep 2018

"she is a woman of true grit and courage, of whom we should all — whatever our views on Brexit — be proud"

I wasn’t at all sure about the book to begin with: it can be sermonising and can slip into self-help cliché. Miller’s call to action sometimes also feels preachy and a little irritating. But as her narrative (brilliantly ghosted by Elizabeth Day) flows, taking us from her childhood in Guyana where her father was a senior prosecutor and talked to her constantly about the importance of the law and doing the right thing, to feeling like an outcast in British society, her passion for speaking up begins to make sense... Before I read Rise I thought Miller was a bit of a pain, an uppity remainer who liked the limelight. Now I understand that she is a woman of true grit and courage, of whom we should all — whatever our views on Brexit — be proud.

Reviews

2 stars out of 5
David Goodhart
1 Sep 2018

"She is clearly a forceful and resourceful woman... and many less tough-minded people will find it hard to follow her remarkable example."

The book, however, is only fleetingly about Brexit. It is mainly a Hollywood-style “triumph against adversity” self-help book, directed mainly at ambitious professional women. The trouble is it quickly becomes trite and repetitive as our heroine bounces back from one disaster after another...The book’s relentless and unsubtle narrative makes it hard to warm to Miller as a person, with the important exception of her moving account of her love for her first child, Lucy-Ann, who was born with brain damage.

3 stars out of 5
Afua Hirsch
23 Aug 2018

"...the book is a lot like its author – unapologetic, businesslike and impatient to make a difference"

The book is at times reminiscent of Sheryl Sandberg’s call to corporate women to “lean in”, at others a confession of Imposter Syndrome, and even a guide on how to get pregnant. At the outset, Miller states her aim in writing it was in large part to encourage others to stand up to oppression themselves, but at times, it feels as if it’s trying to do too much... Miller’s memoir is more descriptive than analytic, leaving me wishing for a deeper analysis of how race, gender and class intersect in fuelling the nature and scale of abuse that comes her way. But then the book is a lot like its author – unapologetic, businesslike and impatient to make a difference.