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Shadow King: The Life and Death of Henry VI Reviews

Shadow King: The Life and Death of Henry VI by Lauren Johnson

Shadow King: The Life and Death of Henry VI

Lauren Johnson

3.83 out of 5

4 reviews

Imprint: Head of Zeus
Publisher: Head of Zeus
Publication date: 7 Mar 2019
ISBN: 9781784979638

A new account of the tragic life and troubled times of Henry VI, who inherited the crowns of both England and France and lost both, in the course of a life blighted by mental illness and bloody civil war.

3 stars out of 5
1 Oct 2019

"Johnson has done her best to provide the first popular account of his reign"

Henry’s place of death in the Tower of London remains unknown, though tradition situates it in the Wakefield Tower, where on 21 May every year lilies and roses are placed in memory of him by representatives of two of his foundations, King’s College, Cambridge, and Eton College. In an appendix, one of the most interesting parts of the book, Johnson argues that it most certainly was not the Wakefield Tower where he died. Henry remains a shadow king, but Lauren Johnson has done her best to provide the first popular account of his reign, even if it is overpowering in length.

Reviews

4 stars out of 5
Minoo Dinshaw
18 Jun 2019

"an involving account of a still undersung saga"

In her new life of Henry VI, the pious and luckless last Lancastrian king of England, the historian Lauren Johnson aims to capture him as “an evolving individual struggling in an extraordinary situation”. If, despite her efforts, Henry VI remains the “shadow king” of her title, this has not stopped Johnson from producing an involving account of a still undersung saga... Where Johnson excels, perhaps as a result of her employment with Historic Royal Palaces, is in her sense of place. Her more venturesome readers will yearn to seek out Beaumaris Castle in North Wales or Sandal Castle in West Yorkshire, while even City wage-slaves will be given good reason to reconsider the ghosts and shadows of Barnet, Islington and the Tower itself 

4 stars out of 5
27 Mar 2019

"eminently readable"

In her excellent biography of the luckless king, Lauren Johnson is cautious about any glib modern diagnosis of Henry’s malady. [...] Johnson has written a long, scrupulously researched book, but an eminently readable one. Even her imaginative purple passages read convincingly, and whether she is describing battles, diplomatic wrangling or medieval courtship she makes us see familiar facts in a new light. Honourable mention should also be made of her publishers, who have produced a richly illustrated book. Together, they have rescued Henry from the shadows. 

4 stars out of 5
Leanda de Lisle
2 Mar 2019

"Johnson is to be commended for doing something different,"

Henry VI has remained in the shadows ever since, with biographers choosing bigger and bloodier characters in Henry’s Yorkist rivals and Tudor heirs. Johnson is to be commended for doing something different, putting him back where he belongs. It is Henry’s character, scrupulously and sensitively drawn by Johnson, that did most to shape the extraordinary and dramatic events of his reign.