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Slow Horses Reviews

Slow Horses by Mick Herron

Slow Horses

Mick Herron

Score pending

2 reviews

Imprint: John Murray Publishers Ltd
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton General Division
Publication date: 27 Jul 2017
ISBN: 9781473674189

You don't stop being a spook just because you're no longer in the game. Banished to Slough House from the ranks of achievers at Regent's Park for various crimes of drugs and drunkenness, lechery and failure, politics and betrayal, Jackson Lamb's misfit crew of highly trained joes don't run ops, they push paper. But not one of them joined the Intelligence Service to be a 'slow horse'.

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Ian Cawley from Rother Books in Battle in East Sussex said: "Very easy to read, very well written and unlike other spy novels, it's also incredibly funny."

Reviews

5 stars out of 5
27 Jan 2018

"The spectacular action set-pieces are expertly handled but they never overwhelm the gleeful cynicism"

Herron has a lively satirist’s eye and a comic sensibility that, in full flow, evokes early Tom Sharpe; these extravagant gifts are housed within a rock-solid plot involving a terrorist gang of unexpected origin acting out the moves of an MI5 playbook. The spectacular action set-pieces are expertly handled but they never overwhelm the gleeful cynicism of Herron’s true subject, which Slow Horses and Whitehall Masters alike understand intuitively as London Rule One: Cover your arse.

5 stars out of 5
3 Apr 2014

"Herron captures perfectly the sense of panic and the consequences of decision-making made on the hoof as events spiral out of control."

In October 2013, Mick Herron picked up the CWA Goldsboro Gold Dagger for his espionage thriller Dead Lions. Here on Crime Fiction Lover we agreed, and awarded the quirky espionage thriller five stars in our review... ... If anything Slow Horses is an even stronger book than Dead Lions, the War on Terror and its execution providing a deliciously ripe target for satire. The planning behind the abduction is all the more horrifying for its credibility. Herron captures perfectly the sense of panic and the consequences of decision-making made on the hoof as events spiral out of control.

The humour and satire make for a very different kind of read to the spy novels of say John LeCarre or Len Deighton and their topicality may eventually date them, but for now Herron’s Slough House series is ahead of the pack.