6,815 book reviews and counting...

The Curse of the School Rabbit Reviews

The Curse of the School Rabbit by Judith Kerr

The Curse of the School Rabbit

Judith Kerr

4.14 out of 5

3 reviews

Category: Children's
Imprint: HarperCollins
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 11 Jul 2019
ISBN: 9780008351847

The brand new, laugh-out-loud story of a boy, a rabbit, and a lot of bad luck, from the one and only Judith Kerr, creator of The Tiger Who Came to Tea and Mog the Forgetful Cat...

  • The Sunday TimesChildren's Book of the Week
4 stars out of 5
Nicolette Jones
14 Jul 2019

" this seems to turn happy memories into a fond farewell."

This is the last book by much-loved illustrator and author Judith Kerr, who died in May at 95. Based on a real episode when her family looked after the school rabbit, this story, like Kerr’s Mr Cleghorn’s Seal, is for newly confident readers, and has softly shaded pencil illustrations... Gently satirical about the theatrical profession, apparently set when Kerr’s children were young, and using the first names of her brother, father, husband and publisher, this seems to turn happy memories into a fond farewell.

Reviews

5 stars out of 5
Melanie McDonagh
11 Aug 2019

"quite brilliant"

Miraculously, [Kerr's] drawing style is almost unchanged from The Tiger Who Came to Tea: the mother here has lovely familiar rounded lines, especially in her dressing gown, and the cast of characters, having escaped modernity, looks just the same as in the early books. The picture of our narrator and the rabbit exchanging sour looks is quite brilliant. The author was a genius, with an affectionate sensibility. The deceptive simplicity of her stories and her capacity to see things from a child’s point of view were very rare gifts. Thank you, Judith Kerr.

4 stars out of 5
James Lovegrove
19 Jul 2019

"In the late author’s last book, family is once again the force that can see characters through anything"

There is this same sense of simplicity, of modesty, in every Kerr book up to and including The Curse of the School Rabbit. Not a word of the text is wasted. Not a single pencil stroke in the illustrations is out of place. There is no showing off here; no aim, apparently, other than to amuse and entertain. Events are most often viewed from the purest perspective, that of a child, one who understands more than most adults realise and accepts more than any adult can.