6,256 book reviews and counting...

The Lives of Lucian Freud: Youth 1922 - 1968 Reviews

The Lives of Lucian Freud: Youth 1922 - 1968 by William Feaver

The Lives of Lucian Freud: YOUTH 1922 - 1968

William Feaver

4.10 out of 5

5 reviews

Imprint: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Publication date: 6 Oct 2016
ISBN: 9781408850930
4 stars out of 5
Laura Freeman
15 Sep 2019

"The painter lied, stole and seduced as he made his name"

Feaver, an art critic of The Observer for 23 years, writes of the paintings — of light, line, flesh and skin — with brilliant insight. Freud’s heroes were Dürer, Grünewald and Bruegel. Ingres’s Madame Moitessier was his ideal painted lady. When he won £980 at cards he bought a Rodin. He sought quattrocento certainty with an edge of the surreal. His portraits were forensic and unforgiving. His second wife was dismayed by her strained, shrunken portrait in Hotel Bedroom (1954). Later she understood Freud’s “genius ability to make the people and objects that came under his scrutiny seem more themselves, and more like themselves, than they ever have been or will be”.

Reviews

4 stars out of 5
Michael Prodger
8 Sep 2019

"Lucian Freud’s wild early life is revealed in this sparkling biography"

Feaver knew Freud for many years before his death in 2011, and although the painter was averse to the idea of a biography, he nevertheless gave him his approval. Their conversations ranged widely and Feaver wrote them up immediately afterwards, resulting in an extraordinary tranche of anecdote and aperçu... It is through innumerable such vivid details that Feaver’s wonderful biography comes close to Freud’s own definition of his art: “A picture should be a recreation of an event rather than an illustration of an object."

5 stars out of 5
Lynn Barber
7 Sep 2019

"William Feaver, former art critic of The Observer, has done a brilliant job of illuminating his difficult, provocative personality"

A second volume is promised, and needed, because this one ends so abruptly if feels as if the publishers have just snatched it out of Feaver’s hands. The last sentence is the oddest I have ever come across: “In Paddington there was a Jewish butcher and the chickens were terribly old and blue and a friend saw talcum powder on them.” But Freud would have approved: he never wanted a neat summing-up.

3 stars out of 5
7 Sep 2019

"[S]elected snippets of gossip, however interesting, are, you might think, peripheral to the life of Lucian Freud. But they tell us something crucial about the first volume of William Feaver’s biography"

[S]elected snippets of gossip, however interesting, are, you might think, peripheral to the life of Lucian Freud. But they tell us something crucial about the first volume of William Feaver’s biography. It is also an autobiography — written up from tapes and daily, noted, telephone conversations with his subject... As a biographical method, the rewards are obvious. Who but a prig doesn’t want to know that Francis Bacon once semi-publicly sucked off an unconscious, superbly endowed workman in a side room of the Colony Room Club? (The man vomited as he came.) The drawbacks are repetition, obscure chronology, tangled confusion in the telling — often quoted directly — and lack of explanatory annotation. On the one hand, first-hand, hand-held authenticity; on the other, a slight uncertainty and sometimes a yen for something more sober, something clearer.

4 stars out of 5
Alexandra Harris
4 Sep 2019

"This is Lucian Freudian biography, packed with momentary stories and fundamentally resisting narrative"

Feaver lets non-sequiturs produce their own effect. There’s some fine judgment in the way he does this. Early on, I puzzled at the disparate events held together in paragraphs. In the teeming chapters of incident I kept expecting the arrival of a controlled narrative, questions posed and resolved, significant others brought sharply into focus. This biography does not work like that. So what is Feaver doing?

In a memorable 2013 essay, Julian Barnes discussed Freud as an “episodicist” for whom “one thing happens and then another”. His was not a linear view of life, concerned with connections and continuities. To an extreme extent, he acted on impulse, barely connecting one moment with the next. Every page of this volume affirms the distinction. No course of action on a Saturday (even marriage) affected his choice of what to do on Tuesday and Wednesday. Feaver replicates this episodicism in telling the life story. This is Lucian Freudian biography, packed with momentary stories and fundamentally resisting narrative