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The Lost Properties of Love Reviews

The Lost Properties of Love by Sophie Ratcliffe

The Lost Properties of Love

Sophie Ratcliffe

3.44 out of 5

5 reviews

Imprint: William Collins
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 7 Feb 2019
ISBN: 9780008225902

What if you could tell the truth about who you are, without risking losing the one you love? This is a book about love affairs and why we choose to have them; a book for anyone who has ever loved and wondered what it is all about.

4 stars out of 5
11 Feb 2019

"I loved the honesty of this book and the way Ratcliffe reminds us that the most intimate details of our lives can all come to light at any time"

Sophie Ratcliffe, an English don at the University of Oxford, has a bag full of sticky pennies, pencil shavings and her children’s half-eaten snacks. But the memory of an old affair with a famous photographer is still rattling around in her heart, setting something in her apart from the mundanity of modern marriage and motherhood and allowing her to forge a spiritual communion with Russian literature’s most famous adulterer, Anna Karenina. The consequence is this peculiarly compelling little book, a rattle bag of beady-eyed literary criticism and personal memoir so startlingly exposed it’s no wonder the subtitle is: An Exhibition of Myself... But I loved the honesty of this book and the way Ratcliffe reminds us that the most intimate details of our lives can all come to light at any time, left behind or stolen on trains, lost properties of love.

Reviews

5 stars out of 5
Cressida Connolly
7 Feb 2019

"(a) wonderful and highly individual book"

A hybrid book of this kind depends for its success upon two things: the intelligence of the writer, and whether or not we like them. Ratcliffe is clearly super-bright. The pages crackle with her cleverness and she has a genius for concision. And, yes, she is extremely likeable. She’s witty and original, but also human: she gets bored making fish fingers for her small children and longs to escape motherhood to find time to write. She thinks about her former lover more than she probably should. Above all, she has all sorts of ideas about things. She sees surprising connections and makes interesting links. She would be the perfect person to find yourself sitting next to on a train. With this book, you almost can.

2 stars out of 5
Bel Mooney
7 Feb 2019

"Fascinating though they are, the literary/historical strands and the personal memoir don't always sit well together."

Fascinating though they are, the literary/historical strands and the personal memoir don't always sit well together. You're just settling into one when the train lurches off from the station and you long for the stop you've just missed.

It's sad but irritating when Ratcliffe wonders (again) why she spends so much time away from her children, instead looking out of train windows and writing. You feel like giving the exhibitionist a couple of books on gratitude and mindfulness.

3 stars out of 5
1 Feb 2019

"This memoir cum literary history covers a dizzying amount of ground"

This book defies definition. Part memoir, part literary history, it reads like a whistlestop tour of the author’s life events and preoccupations. The subtitle is An Exhibition of Myself and the experience of turning the pages feels like wandering through a charming and eccentric museum where the curation is down to personal taste... My yardstick for judging books about books is whether or not they drive me to visit or revisit their subject matter. The night I finished The Lost Properties of Love, I took Anna Karenina to bed with me for the gazillionth time. I even fancy giving Trollope another go, and that is high praise indeed.

4 stars out of 5
Kathryn Hughes
24 Jan 2019

"Ratcliffe’s description of loss, which she lugs through the next 30 years, is wonderfully done"

Ratcliffe’s description of loss, which she lugs through the next 30 years, is wonderfully done. She describes her particular version as having grey pilled fur and webbed feet. Her loss is clammy and smelly and turns up to spoil everything that is supposed to be good – Christmas, sex, conversations with new friends (her loss has a weakness for alcohol and a tendency to overshare)... There is a trend at the moment for books in which swotty women consult classic literature to help them through the growing pains of middle age... In this book Ratcliffe, an Oxford English don, tries to do even more, straining – and it does feel strained in places – to produce a text so capacious that all the lost things of her life, of all our lives, can finally find their proper place.