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The Sealwoman's Gift Reviews

The Sealwoman's Gift by Sally Magnusson

The Sealwoman's Gift

Sally Magnusson

4.64 out of 5

4 reviews

Imprint: Two Roads
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton General Division
Publication date: 12 Jun 2018
ISBN: 9781473638983

Selected for the Zoe Ball ITV Book Club and BBC Radio 2 Book Club. The debut novel of abduction and slavery set in 17th century Iceland and North Africa by Sunday Times bestselling author and broadcaster Sally Magnusson.

2 Prizes for The Sealwoman's Gift

Zoe Ball Book Club
Selection

Sally Magnusson has taken an amazing true event and created a brilliant first novel.  It’s an epic journey in every sense, although it’s historical it’s incredibly relevant to our world today. We had to pick it.

Radio 2
Selection: Radio 2 Book Club

Reviews

5 stars out of 5
Sian Norris
1 Mar 2018

"Magnusson takes us on a journey that not only crosses continents, but encompasses tragedy and rich sensuality"

This is an extraordinarily immersive read that emphasises the power of stories, examining themes of motherhood, identity, exile and freedom. Through her deft storytelling, Magnusson takes us on a journey that not only crosses continents, but encompasses tragedy and rich sensuality.

4 stars out of 5
Nick Rennison
18 Feb 2018

"Richly imagined and energetically told... a powerful tale of loss and endurance."

In 1627, corsairs from Algiers raided the coast of Iceland, killing dozens and carrying off at least 400 people to the slave markets of North Africa. It remains one of the most traumatic events in Icelandic history, and Sally Magnusson has chosen it as the subject of The Sealwoman’s Gift, her moving, accomplished debut novel....Richly imagined and energetically told, The Sealwoman’s Gift is a powerful tale of loss and endurance.

5 stars out of 5
Allan Massie
10 Feb 2018

"...a delightful piece of storytelling which is also a story about telling stories"

One is inclined in a brief review to concentrate on the novel’s themes, and this is fair enough, for they are interesting, oddly charming and yet also often disconcerting. But for many it may be Sally Magnusson’s descriptive skill, and her ability to capture the feeling of place and a distant time, which are most delightful. In short, this is the best sort of historical novel. It respects the past and brings it alive.

4 stars out of 5
3 Feb 2018

"...an impressive debut from Magnusson"

Magnusson has chosen a fascinating and little-known historical event as the starting point for her tale of surviving, and even thriving, against the odds. She adds a much-needed female perspective to Egilsson’s memoir of his journeys, providing Asta with a fully rounded personality and a curious mind to explore the new world she finds herself in...This is an impressive debut from Magnusson who seems to have inherited her Icelandic ancestors’ talent for beguiling storytelling.