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The Stone Sky Reviews

The Stone Sky by N. K. Jemisin

The Stone Sky

The Broken Earth, Book 3

N. K. Jemisin

5.00 out of 5

3 reviews

Imprint: Orbit
Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group
Publication date: 15 Aug 2017
ISBN: 9780356508689

The remarkable conclusion to the record-breaking triple Hugo Award-winning fantasy trilogy that began with The Fifth Season

2 Prizes for The Stone Sky

Hugo Awards
2018 Winner: Best Novel
Nebula Awards
2017 Winner: Best Novel

Reviews

5 stars out of 5
Niall Alexander
16 Nov 2018

"It’s devastating. Poignant and personal and almost impossibly powerful..."

As the conclusion to a trilogy that started strong and then stopped, The Stone Sky gave me everything that I wanted, and then it gave me more. It’s devastating. Poignant and personal and almost impossibly powerful... The Broken Earth is in totality one of the great trilogies of our time, and if all is well with the world, its thoroughly thrilling third volume should surely secure N. K. Jemisin a third Hugo Award.

5 stars out of 5
Andrew Liptak
17 Aug 2018

"The Stone Sky is a phenomenal end to a fantastic series"

Every now and again there comes a work that seeks to redefine the face of genre literature, from Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness to William Gibson’s Neuromancer. With the Broken Earth trilogy, Jemisin has made a place for herself among these greats, pulling off a landmark story that blends fantasy, science fiction, and post-apocalyptic tropes. Finishing The Stone Sky left me utterly breathless by the scale and scope of what Jemisin accomplished in these three books — narratively, technically, and thematically.

5 stars out of 5
Andrew O’Hehir
26 Sep 2017

"The 21st-Century fantasy trilogy that changed the game"

The Broken Earth trilogy is a work of allegory and allusion, not a straightforward political parable in the vein of “Planet of the Apes” or Stephen Vincent Benét’s “By the Waters of Babylon”...Much later, after the spectacular final battle between mother and daughter, which only one can survive, he tells the victor that “different choices have always been possible.” It’s a fitting moral to her story, and to all of our stories.