14,765 book reviews and counting...

Books in the Media Update

This website is no longer being updated; theBookseller.com is the home of all books related-content and will continue to be updated with regular articles about books featured in the media. Thank you for using this website, and we hope you join us on theBookseller.com.

The Swallow's Flight Reviews

The Swallow's Flight by Hilary McKay

The Swallows' Flight

Hilary McKay

Score pending

2 reviews

Category: Children's
Imprint: Macmillan Children's Books
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
Publication date: 27 May 2021
ISBN: 9781529033335

Return to the world of Skylarks' War in this heartbreaking follow up - a WWII story that spans generations and crosses the divides of war.

  • The Sunday TimesChildren's Book of the Week
4 stars out of 5
Nicolette Jones
23 May 2021

"Separately and together, The Skylarks’ War and The Swallows’ Flight are pinnacles of children’s literature"

This compassionate sequel does the same with the Second World War as it continues the stories of kind-hearted Clarry and those she cares about: Rupert, Peter, Vanessa and Violet. It also introduces the next generation and, against a background of Kristallnacht and the Luftwaffe, two sympathetic German boys. The youngsters’ lives converge as they grow up and into themselves. Along the way we we see acts of understated heroism and appreciate the children’s sensibilities through witty prose that always rewards close attention. Separately and together, The Skylarks’ War and The Swallows’ Flight are pinnacles of children’s literature.

Reviews

4 stars out of 5
Alex O’Connell
23 May 2021

"a wartime follow-up well worth the wait"

At last, a follow-up to The Skylarks’ War, Hilary McKay’s wonderful 2018 story of the Penrose family’s journey through the First World War. Now the children and young folk of that novel have grown up and made way for a new set of characters who must come of age while living through a different fight, with parents who have experienced the Great War and must endure its legacies.

It’s a resounding success — I adored the first but adored this more. McKay refuses to dumb down the history, writing with such clarity and understanding that you can’t fail to be caught up in the cares of her loveable cast. There’s a useful family tree at the back for those, like me, with memories like a shot-at tin helmet — as well as a helpful glossary.