14,765 book reviews and counting...

Books in the Media Update

This website is no longer being updated; theBookseller.com is the home of all books related-content and will continue to be updated with regular articles about books featured in the media. Thank you for using this website, and we hope you join us on theBookseller.com.

Under the Blue Reviews

Under the Blue by Oana Aristide

Under the Blue

Oana Aristide

Score pending

2 reviews

Imprint: Profile Books Ltd
Publisher: Profile Books Ltd
Publication date: 11 Mar 2021
ISBN: 9781788165839
5 stars out of 5
Lisa Tuttle
9 Apr 2021

"a beautifully written, emotionally gripping book"

 Interwoven with the story of this oddly matched trio on a road trip across an abruptly depopulated Europe during a long, hot summer is another, very different narrative set in a research station in the Arctic Circle. Through transcripts of sessions between scientists and an artificial intelligence known as Talos XI, we observe the creation of an AI made to predict disasters in the making, and offer the best solutions, or means of prevention. The discussions between human and AI are fascinating, revealing different ways of perceiving reality. The two stories come together to provide a surprising, satisfying conclusion to a beautifully written, emotionally gripping book.

Reviews

5 stars out of 5
Simon Ings
15 Mar 2021

"the mood of this debut is achingly believable, unsensational and, on occasion, chilling"

Harry is eventually joined by his old London neighbour (whom he rather fancies) and her sister, “all 5-foot 6-inches of brash inconvenience”. They have arrived with a plan to escape deserted Britain to Africa before all the abandoned nuclear power stations blow up. Looming over their decision-making about what to do is a second, seemingly unrelated narrative, about the creation of an artificially intelligent prediction machine whose grimmest prognostications are treated as errors by its builders. The moral of Under the Blue seems to be that people cannot bear too much reality, and it’s a point most ingeniously made.