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Under The Wig Reviews

Under The Wig by William Clegg

Under the Wig

A Lawyer's Stories of Murder, Guilt and Innocence

William Clegg

Score pending

2 reviews

Imprint: Canbury Press
Publisher: Canbury Press
Publication date: 4 Oct 2018
ISBN: 9781912454082

William Clegg QC, is a celebrated criminal lawyer who specialises in murder cases.

In Under the Wig he revisits his most intriguing trials, from the acquittal of Colin Stagg to the shooting of Jill Dando, to the man given life because of an earprint.

All the while he reveals the inside of the criminal law, from the rivalry among barristers to the nervous moments before a verdict comes back and how our right to a fair trial is at risk.

Under the Wig is for anyone who wants to know the reality of a murder trial.

4 stars out of 5
Jane Shilling
23 May 2019

"jovial memoir reflects on the challenges and satisfactions of life as a barrister"

William Clegg QC is frequently asked how he can defend someone he knows is guilty. He has defended more than 100 people accused of murder, ‘probably more than any other lawyer practising in England’...

Between such serious case studies, his jovial memoir reflects on the challenges and satisfactions of life as a barrister.

Reviews

3 stars out of 5
28 Apr 2019

"mixes the excitement of the courtroom and some practical tips on advocacy with the more mundane life of the working lawyer"

Under the Wig mixes the excitement of the courtroom and some practical tips on advocacy with the more mundane life of the working lawyer. Some of it is very mundane: I wasn’t entirely gripped by the drama of moving from one set of chambers to another, even though the new set boasted video-conferencing facilities and air-conditioning. Fancy that. There are some good stories, though, such as the defendant who announced his name as “Mr F***wit”. The judge deflated this by simply asking the clerk to amend the paperwork, and the case carried on under this name. Clegg also reveals that, early in his career, it was common for solicitors to pay court reporters to slip off for a coffee, and thus absent themselves, if a celebrity client was up before the beak. So much for “you cannot hope to bribe or twist, thank God, the British journalist”.