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Unfree Speech Reviews

Unfree Speech by Joshua Wong, Ai Weiwei

Unfree Speech

The Threat to Global Democracy and Why We Must Act, Now

Joshua Wong, Ai Weiwei

4.00 out of 5

3 reviews

Imprint: Penguin Books
Publisher: Penguin Books
Publication date: 18 Feb 2020
ISBN: 9780143135715
  • The ObserverBook of the Week
4 stars out of 5
Tim Adams
26 Jan 2020

"Wong’s story is not unlike Thunberg’s"

This book is a memoir of an extraordinary decade in which Wong went from a nerdy obsession with Marvel comics to a Netflix documentary in which he was characterised as a superhero for democracy. It is also a call to arms to that generation that has known nothing but Instagram and Snapchat – a manifesto to “follow news sites for warning signs of political polarisation”, to use “fact-checking media”, to get out from behind their screens “to attend rallies and help organise election campaigns” and to remember, above all, any effort to preserve democracy “starts with one voice, one flyer and one speech”.

Reviews

4 stars out of 5
Rana Mitter
2 Feb 2020

"a powerful insight into the turbulence on the city’s streets that made world headlines for much of 2014 and again in 2019"

Casual observers looking at Wong would see a classic 23-year-old geek, with a pudding-bowl haircut and big glasses. He certainly doesn’t look like one of the most prominent political activists in the world, whose campaign of civil disobedience has been a central part of the protest against Beijing’s growing dominance in Hong Kong’s politics. Yet his book Unfree Speech, which combines memoir, prison diary and manifesto, is a powerful insight into the turbulence on the city’s streets that made world headlines for much of 2014 and again in 2019.... Wong’s account of the 2014 movement is poignant, and reminds us how young many of those involved were. “Every day protesters alternated between pushing back the police on the front lines,” Wong writes, “and doing homework.” When he writes about becoming friends with “tattooed street-gang types” in juvenile detention, and joshing them about the new PS4 game console he had waiting at home, you can see his conflict between the political activist and the boy with normal teenage obsessions.

4 stars out of 5
Richard Lloyd Parry
29 Jan 2020

"Wong and his co-author Jason Ng have successfully and readably padded out the account with prison diaries, essays and manifestos"

Partly this is about human and political rights, and the encroachment of Chinese authoritarianism on the freedoms guaranteed by the “one country, two systems” arrangement. Partly it is about economics and the surge of money from the mainland that has made Hong Kong unaffordable to many of its people. However, Wong puts his finger on the psychological drama at the root of the conflict, which is as much a quest for a collective identity as a campaign for democracy.