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Untrue: Why Nearly Everything We Believe About Women, Lust and Infidelity is Untrue Reviews

Untrue: Why Nearly Everything We Believe About Women, Lust and Infidelity is Untrue by Wednesday Martin

Untrue

Why nearly everything we believe about women and lust and infidelity is untrue

Wednesday Martin

3.14 out of 5

4 reviews

Imprint: Scribe Publications
Publisher: Scribe Publications
Publication date: 11 Oct 2018
ISBN: 9781911617310

A jaw-dropping re-evaluation of everything we thought we knew about men, women, and sex.

2 stars out of 5
Sarah Ditum
16 Jan 2019

"the question of what women “really” are is worth asking"

Martin’s long digression into secondary material is even more frustrating when her primary sources are so interesting: her interviews with the women who cheat are vivid and humane, and a better version of this book would have made those the spine, and subtly dispersed the supporting science... Martin fundamentally misses how flexible patriarchy can be... The question of what women “really” are is worth asking for its own sake, but only the naive can expect the truth to set us free without an understanding of power. 

Reviews

2 stars out of 5
Johanna Thomas-Corr
18 Oct 2018

"Untrue contains plenty to titillate rich Upper East Siders but has surprisingly little to say about toxic post-MeToo sexual politics. "

Untrue contains plenty to titillate rich Upper East Siders but has surprisingly little to say about toxic post-MeToo sexual politics. And I fear that for many women, this message of erotic empowerment will become another stick with which to beat ourselves. As well as having the immaculate home of Marie Kondo, the entrepreneurial flair of Sheryl Sandberg, the sass of Beyoncé and the social conscience of Angelina Jolie, we’re supposed to be putting it about like a bonobo on heat? Sounds awfully tiring.

4 stars out of 5
Christina Patterson
14 Oct 2018

"a personal quest and great fun"

If some of this sounds a bit dry, it isn’t. Martin is a lively, witty and engaging writer. While some of her interviewees are fluent in cultural studies, she manages to translate their thoughts into something that sounds like English, an English that’s punchy and clear. She is a natural storyteller. She moves seamlessly between suburban housewives, “rock star” academics, macaque monkeys and indigenous tribes. Her narrative is studded with surprises and even some cliffhangers. “It was not the rise of the nation state or even organised religion,” she says at the end of one chapter, that caused the “overarching cultural shift” from “female independence” to “subservience and dependence”. It was, she says, and it lands like a bombshell, “agriculture”.

3 stars out of 5
4 Oct 2018