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Warrior Reviews

Warrior by Edoardo Albert, Paul Gething

Warrior

A Life of War in Anglo-Saxon Britain

Edoardo Albert, Paul Gething

Score pending

2 reviews

Category: Non-fiction, History
Imprint: Granta Books
Publisher: Granta Books
Publication date: 7 May 2020
ISBN: 9781783784431

Warrior tells the story of forgotten man, a man whose bones were found in an Anglo-Saxon graveyard at Bamburgh castle in Northumberland. It is the story of a violent time when Britain was defining itself in waves of religious fervour, scattered tribal expansion and terrible bloodshed; it is the story of the fighting class, men apart, defined in life and death by their experiences on the killing field; it is an intricate and riveting narrative of survival and adaptation set in the stunning political and physical landscapes of medieval England.

  • The BooksellerEditor's Choice
5 stars out of 5
Caroline Sanderson
7 Jun 2019

"A riveting, brilliantly written account."

This enthralling book excavates the story of an unknown man whose bones were found in an Anglo-Saxon graveyard at Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland. Brothers-in-law Albert, a writer, and Gething, the lead archaeologist on the dig, bring him thrillingly back to life, revealing his origins and recreating the turbulent times in which he lived, when Britain was a patchwork of competing kingdoms, riven by waves of religious fervour, scattered tribal expansion and terrible bloodshed. A riveting, brilliantly written account.

Reviews

4 stars out of 5
12 Oct 2019

"the disruptive and imaginative force of archaeology revealed"

This latest contribution not only adds colour to the lives of those who may have surrounded such a king, but provides a fine insight into the archaeological community that can bring them back to life. Some of the book’s most enjoyable chapters are about the lives of eccentric excavators — such as Augustus Pitt Rivers, Brian Hope Taylor and Lewis Binford — who expanded our ability to understand what lies beneath and pass judgment on the lives of our forefathers.