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Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race Reviews

Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race  by Reni Eddo-Lodge

Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race

Reni Eddo-Lodge

4.77 out of 5

8 reviews

Imprint: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Publication date: 1 Jun 2017
ISBN: 9781408870556

In 2014, award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge wrote about her frustration with the way that discussions of race and racism in Britain were being led by those who weren't affected by it. She posted a piece on her blog, entitled: `Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race'. Her words hit a nerve.

1 Prize for Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race

The British Book Awards
2018 Books of the Year

WINNER: NON-FICTION/NARRATIVE

The judges of the Non-Fiction: Narrative category said Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People about Race was “fascinating”, “brilliant” and “breathtaking”, and one described the deal as a “very, very smart acquisition” for Bloomsbury, which “added value to the book: it could have been consigned to obscurity if it wasn’t packaged right”. The author played her part, speaking at more than 40 events in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the Netherlands, and posing for the front cover of Stylist magazine.

Reviews

5 stars out of 5
Aleesha Badkar
17 Jun 2020

"this incredible book just made history"

Not only is it an eye-opening read, this incredible book just made history. Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race topped Nielsen BookScan’s UK top 50 in the week to 13 June, making her the first black British author to take the top slot since Nielsen began recording book sales in 2001.

An essential read for anyone who wants to better understand race relations in Britain today.

5 stars out of 5
7 Jun 2020

"this book is an important read to understand race relations in our culture"

The book sparked a national conversation and became a Sunday Times Bestseller and was named both Blackwell’s and Foyle’s Non-Fiction Book of the Year on its release in 2018.

Now more than ever this book is an important read to understand race relations in our culture.

5 stars out of 5
Arielle Tchiprout
3 Jun 2020

"an important educational tool for white allies"

She explores everything from the erasure of Black history to the link between class and race, and provides an important educational tool for white allies.

4 stars out of 5
Jennifer Savin
3 Jun 2020

"a valuable insight into racism in Britain today"

A book born out of a viral blog post of the same name, Eddo-Lodge (an award-winning journalist) offers a valuable insight into racism in Britain today – her work is educational while remaining accessible. Despite being published three years ago, Eddo-Lodge's book continues to rack up sales to such an extent that she recently tweeted asking if people could match the amount they paid for a copy (or instead borrow the book from a friend or library) and donate to a racial justice organisation too.

5 stars out of 5
Lizz Schumer
3 Jun 2020

"pick up this book to learn more"

While this book addresses the Black experience in Britain, it's applicable for all of us. If you've wondered why it's problematic to ask Black people to educate the rest of us on race, pick up this book to learn more. 

5 stars out of 5
Erica Wagner
3 Jun 2020

"a dramatic recognition"

Gal-Dem called this debut 'the black British bible'. It began with a 2014 blog post addressed to those who refused to recognise the structural racism of British society, to those who 'truly believe that the experiences of their life as a result of their skin colour can and should be universal.' It’s a dramatic recognition of what she calls 'white denial'. 

5 stars out of 5
31 May 2020

"mapping the ramifications of racial bias in the UK"

The title is lifted from Eddo-Lodge’s own viral blog post from 2014, in which she famously declared that she had had enough of trying to reason with white people who were “living a life oblivious to the fact that their skin colour is the norm and all others deviate from it”. The full work expands on this concept – picking apart the insidious nature of white privilege in minute detail – and mapping the ramifications of racial bias in the UK, from slavery through to the lynch mobs that swept across key British cities following the First World War.

4 stars out of 5
3 Jun 2017

"accurately takes the temperature of racial discussions in the UK"

ut Eddo-Lodge accurately takes the temperature of racial discussions in the UK. In seven crisp essays, she takes white British people to task for failing to accept that “racism is a white problem”. “White privilege,” she writes, “is a manipulative, suffocating blanket of power that envelops everything we know, like a snowy day.”

She’s strong on the pervasive racial marginalisation of black people, for example in the depiction of the working class that still so often comes with the prefix “white”.